Jenne Farm

The farm

Floyd Jr. was the last Jenne to live here; other members of the extended family live here now. Floyd Jr.’s sister, Linda Kidder, has been trustee of the 460-acre spread since 2003. She grew up here, until she was 18, and remembers when the photographers began to descend, in the mid-1950s, after students at a local photography school started snapping shots of the 1813 farm, built by her forebears. The photogenic setting soon caught the eye of Life magazine, Vermont Life, and, of course, Yankee. “It was pretty overwhelming,” she recalls, standing beside an enclosure of Herefords wading in mud. An attractive woman on the verge of retirement, her eyes linger over a landscape that lives in her blood; Jennes have been on this land since 1790. “[People] would come by the busload and mill around,” she recalls. “We always had beagle puppies, and they’d ask me to hold one of the puppies, take my picture, and give me nickels, dimes, and quarters.”

Jenne Farm

In 1955, a photography school in South Woodstock discovered Jenne Farm’s mystique. Students lined up along Jenne Road to capture their feelings of the wayside farm, publishing their works in local magazines and publications. Before long, scenes of the farm appeared in Vermont LifeYankee, and Life magazines, later gracing covers of corporate annual reports and more docile publications. The farm has even appeared in commercials for Budweiser Beer and in two movies: Forrest Gump and Funny Farm.